Georgia Parole attorney

Parole & Criminal Defense lawyer

If you are facing a parole decision or current criminal charges, you are in the right place. The Law Firm of Abbi S. Taylor fights for individuals and families in the post-conviction process as well as in the courtroom. We give everything we have to fight for our clients' freedom. Contact us today for more information about how we can help you return home.

What does a parole attorney do?

i will Help you through the parole process

In Georgia, every individual serving a felony sentence in prison is considered for parole by the time he or she  completes one third of his or her  sentence (Parole Eligibility Date (“PED”)  is equal to one-third of the prison sentence). A decision then is made concerning his or her release date. (Tentative Parole Month or “TPM”). The case will be considered even if it is still on appeal.

The file maintained by the Parole Board, regarding any given individual, contains material obtained from law enforcement, prosecutorial agencies, court officials, Georgia Department of Corrections officials, and victims. This material is not  necessarily favorable or current and it is unlikely that an individual would want it to be the only information reviewed by the Parole Board when deciding his or her TPM. Unfortunately, an individual does not have an opportunity to speak to the Parole Board before it makes its decision.

I can ensure that, despite not having an opportunity to speak, with our assistance your voice will be heard and that favorable information is shared with the Parole Board.

"Ms. Taylor was very honest and straightforward about the parole process and the steps involved before and after my hearing. I stand before you today a free man because of Ms. Taylor’s efforts."

Do you need a parole attorney?

A parole attorney will fight for your loved one's freedom

You do not have to be represented by an attorney to be considered for any type of clemency in Georgia. However, having Abbi, an experienced parole attorney, by your side can help your case tremendously.

For example, our law firm can help ensure that your file contains accurate and positive information, challenge inaccurate material, and request reconsideration of previous decisions

FaQ's

Q.

What is the State Board of Pardons and Paroles?

A.

The Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles is a five-member panel assigned the power to grant pardons, paroles, and other forms of clemency. The Board has discretion to release inmates from imprisonment once an inmate has served part of his or her prison sentence.

The Parole Board uses Parole Decision Guidelines when determining whether or not an inmate should be released on parole. The Guidelines, also called the “grid system, weigh an inmate’s crime severity and his or her likelihood of success on parole”.

The Parole Board also has the sole constitutional authority in Georgia to commute death sentences to either life imprisonment or life without parole.

Q.

Who is eligible for parole?

A.

In Georgia, inmates serving a felony sentence in prison are automatically considered for parole by the time they reach their Parole Eligibility Date (PED) which is one-third of their prison sentence. No application is necessary. An inmate will be considered for parole even if the inmate’s case is on appeal.

Q.

What Cases Are Not Eligible For Parole?

A.

Certain inmates are not eligible for parole. These cases include the following:

  • Inmates serving life sentences without the possibility of parole,
  • Inmates convicted of four or more felonies and sentenced as a recidivist;
  • Inmates serving non-life sentences for violent felonies such as rape, aggravated sodomy, aggravated child molestation, aggravated sexual battery, armed robbery, or kidnapping.

Q.

What happens at a parole hearing for a parole date?

A.

When considering parole, the Parole Board will review a recommendation of months, or a percentage of the sentence, that the inmate should serve. The recommendation is based on the Parole Decision Guidelines, which weighs the severity of the crime, the likelihood of reoffending, and the offender’s criminal and social history.

The Parole Board will then make a decision regarding the release date, which is called a Tentative Parole Month (TPM). However, a TPM is not a final decision. The Parole Board will complete its review of the case file and determine whether to set a release date at the TPM.

Q.

Can I appeal a parole decision?

A.

In Georgia, inmates may appeal parole decisions under two circumstances.
First, an inmate may ask the Parole Board to reconsider its decision if parole was denied, or they may ask for an earlier reconsideration date. A request for reconsideration will not be granted, however, unless the inmate has new and compelling information for the Parole Board.

Second, an inmate can request the Parole Board to correct an error in its calculation under the Parole Decision Guidelines. This request can be made if, for example, the Parole Board made an error in the risk to reoffend or an error in the crime severity level.

Q.

Do I need a parole attorney?

A.

Individuals who are eligible for parole are not required to hire an attorney, however, hiring a parole attorney can help your chances of receiving a favorable parole decision. The Parole Board will review information provided by law enforcement, the prosecution, court officials, victims and the Georgia Department of Corrections. If you do not have a parole attorney, the Parole Board will not have the positive information you want them to consider.

A parole attorney can ensure that favorable information is shared with the Parole Board. For example, a parole lawyer can help ensure that your file contains accurate and positive information, challenge inaccurate material, and request reconsideration of previous decisions.

Q.

Will my loved one be able to attend the parole hearing?

A.

In Georgia, the Parole Board does not hold hearings before making parole decisions and does not allow people in prison to go before the Board to argue their case. The members of the Parole Board review each parole file individually, then each member casts his or her vote to grant or deny parole. The Board does not meet as a group to make parole decisions. Does a life sentence really mean a life sentence?

Q.

Will my loved one be able to attend the parole hearing establishing the TPM?

A.

No, the Board does not currently conduct any in person hearings.

Q.

Can you guarantee that the parole decision will be successful?

A.

We can never guarantee that we will be successful and that your loved one will get parole, but we will work hard to the very best of our ability to reach a favourable decision. We have a very good success rate and evaluate a case before being hired. We do our very best to ensure that your loved one’s voice is heard and that all positive information and background is considered.

Q.

How does the PIC points system work?

A.

A loved one can earn Performance Incentive Credits by completing their case plan, working on some of the work details and other educational programs. Each point, up to 12 PIC points, can be awarded by the Board to take one month per point off of the established TPM. However, PIC points are discretionary, just like parole. The Board can choose to award credit for some, all or none of the person’s PIC points.

Q.

My loved one received a letter from the Board stating that he has a Parole Eligibility Date. What should he do with the letter?

A.

The family should contact a parole attorney straight away.

ready to get started?

If you have questions about parole or other post-conviction proceedings, we are here to help. Contact us today to schedule a free consultation.

Get in Touch

Contact our office today to schedule a free consultation.

Mailing address

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.